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Ancient Egypt /
Religion
1. Introduction
2. Gods
3. Concepts
4. Cult
5. Cult centres
6. Necropolises
7. Structures

Detailed articleAncient Egypt



























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Open map of Ancient EgyptAncient Egypt / Religion / Gods /
Apis



Wall relief of Apis. Hatshepsut Temple, Luxor, Egypt.
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Wall relief of Apis. Hatshepsut Temple, Luxor, Egypt.

Apis statue, of the 30th Dynasty, 4th century BCE. Louvre Museum, Paris, France.
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Apis statue, of the 30th Dynasty, 4th century BCE. Louvre Museum, Paris, France.

A cult centre for Apis at the Serapeum at Saqqara, Egypt.
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A cult centre for Apis at the Serapeum at Saqqara, Egypt.

In Ancient Egyptian religion deity depicted as a bull, and not as an anthropomorphic god. However, in some representations he is presented as a man with a bull's head.
Apis was probably at first a fertility god confined to grain and herds, but he developed into a god associated with the dead. As a twin deity, Apis-Atum, he was also connected to a solar cult, and from this period is depicted with a solar disc within his horns. His colours were white and black, with special markings.
According to some myths he was created from a ray of light; in others, he himself was born from a bull.
The cult around Apis started early in Egyptian history, and can be dated back to about 3000 BCE. A court in the temple of Ptah at Memphis was devoted to Apis. Apis was in many cults associated with Serapis. Close to his cult, there were sacred bulls, which were buried in great ceremonies.
Even in Memphis there was an oracle associated with Apis, that was widely respected all over Egypt.





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By Tore Kjeilen