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Bukhari
Arabic: muhammad bni ismā¢īl abū ¢abd allāh al-ju¢fī al-bukhārī



Hadiths of Bukhari





Vol Book Title
1 1 Revelation
1 2 Belief
1 3 Knowledge
1 4 Ablutions
1 5 Bathing
1 6 Menstrual Periods
1 7 Rubbing hands and feet with dust
1 8 Prayers
1 9 Virtues of the Prayer Hall
1 10 Times of the Prayers
1 11 Call to Prayers
1 12 Characteristics of Prayer
2 13 Friday Prayer
2 14 Fear Prayer
2 15 The Two Festivals
2 16 Witr Prayer
2 17 Invoking Allah for Rain
2 18 Eclipses
2 19 Prostration During Recital of Koran
2 20 Shortening the Prayers
2 21 Prayer at Night
2 22 Actions while Praying
2 23 Funerals
2 24 Obligatory Charity Tax
2 25 Obligatory Charity Tax After Ramadaan
2 26 Pilgrimage
3 27 Minor Pilgrimage
3 28 Pilgrims Prevented from Completing the Pilgrimage
3 29 Penalty of Hunting while on Pilgrimage
3 30 Virtues of Madinah
3 31 Fasting
3 32 Praying at Night in Ramadaan
3 33 Retiring to a Mosque for Remembrance of Allah
3 34 Sales and Trade
3 35 Sales in which a Price is paid for Goods to be Delivered Later
3 36 Hiring
3 37 Transferance of a Debt from One Person to Another
3 38 Representation, Authorization, Business by Proxy
3 39 Agriculture
3 40 Distribution of Water
3 41 Loans, Payment of Loans, Freezing of Property, Bankruptcy
3 42 Lost Things Picked up by Someone
3 43 Oppressions
3 44 Partnership
3 45 Mortgaging
3 46 Manumission of Slaves
3 47 Gift
3 48 Witnesses
3 49 Peacemaking
3 50 Conditions
4 51 Wills and Testaments
4 52 Fighting for the Cause of Allah
4 53 One-fifth of Booty to the Cause of Allah
4 54 Beginning of Creation
4 55 Prophets
4 56 Virtues and Merits of the Prophet and his Companions
5 57 Companions of the Prophet
5 58 Merits of the Helpers in Madinah
5 59 Military Expeditions led by the Prophet
6 60 Prophetic Commentary on the Koran
6 61 Virtues of the Koran
7 62 Wedlock, Marriage
7 63 Divorce
7 64 Supporting the Family
7 65 Food, Meals
7 66 Sacrifice on Occasion of Birth
7 67 Hunting, Slaughtering
7 68 Al-Adha Festival Sacrifice
7 69 Drinks
7 70 Patients
7 71 Medicine
7 72 Dress
8 73 Good Manners and Form
8 74 Asking Permission
8 75 Invocations
8 76 To make the Heart Tender
8 77 Divine Will
8 78 Oaths and Vows
8 79 Expiation for Unfulfilled Oaths
8 80 Laws of Inheritance
8 81 Limits and Punishments set by Allah
8 82 Punishment of Disbelievers at War with Allah and His apostle
9 83 Blood Money
9 84 Dealing with Apostates
9 85 Saying Something under Compulsion
9 86 Tricks
9 87 Interpretation of Dreams
9 88 Afflictions and the End of the World
9 89 Judgments
9 90 Wishes
9 91 Accepting Information Given by a Truthful Person
9 92 Holding Fast to the Koran and Sunnah
9 93 Oneness, uniqueness og Allah
(810-870) Sunni Muslim religious historian; collector of hadiths. His work is not considered reliable by Shi'is.
His collected traditions are named Sahih Bukhari, i.e. 'Authentic by Bukhari'. Its original title was al-Jami' al-Sahih, 'Authentic Collection'.
His collection contains 7275 traditions, validated (see Isnad) out of a material of 600,000. What makes a single tradition is not unambiguous; two may be duplicates or complimentary, and one may in fact well be divided. The small number of authenticated traditions indicates to what extent fantasy or inaccuracy had taken toll of Islamic tradition at his time.
His well organized, superior in that respect to the Koran. All traditions are rendered as they had been transmitted to him, each organized into its most appropriate of 93 sections; many traditions deal with more than one theme.
The excellent organization by Bukhari is part of the reason for his popularity and influence. Over time, Muslims have come to declare his collection for perfect. It has been lifted up to a level almost as high as that of the Koran, in both theology and jurisprudence.
His personal point of view was conservative, and he opposed the Mu'tazili orientation.
Although Bukhari's technique was profoundly honest, diligently and excellently carried through, the technique itself was far from perfect seen with modern eyes. It had no means to identify fake or altered traditions with plausible content and perfectly constructed isnads. As his work began 200 years after the death of Muhammad there was no contemporaries to seek guidance with, he had no form of neutral sources and there was nothing like an archaeological science at his time.

Biography
810 July 21: Born in Bukhara (modern Uzbekistan), into a mixed Arab/Persian family.
821: Begins his studies of the words and works of Muhammad and the first Muslims, known as Sira.
826: Performs hajj, and begins journeys to several cities, searching for traditions.
842: Returns to Bukhara, beginning the compilation of the traditions.
846: Finishes his hadith collection.
870 August 31: Dies in Khartanak, near Bukhara.




By Tore Kjeilen