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Islam
INTRODUCTION
1. Orientations
a. Figures
2. Koran
3. Theology
4. Concept of divine
5. Sharia
6. Muhammad
7. Cult and Festivals
8. Mecca
9. Cultic personalities
10. Caliph
11. Structures
12. Popular religion
13. Others
14. Calendar



























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Islam / Sharia / Madhhab /
Hanafi
Arabic: hanafiyya



Sharia
Madhhab
Schools, or directions of Sharia.
Hanafi
Hanbali
Maliki
Shafi'i
All above are Sunni.
Jafari
Shi'i school.

Sources
Sunna
Hadith
Isnad
Sira

Fiqh
Methods of Sharia.
Qiyas
Ijma
Ijtihad
Ra'y
Bid'a

School of Shari'a, the legal system (madhhab) of Sunni Islam, today used among Sunnis in all Middle Eastern states, from Sudan in the south to Turkey in the north, and as far east as Iran: Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Iran, Palestine, Israel, Jordan, Egypt, Sudan.
The Hanafi school is named after Imam Abu Hanifa, but it was mainly through two of his pupils, Abu Yusuf Ya¢qub and Muhammad Shaybani, that its tenets were formed.
Compared to other Shari'a schools, the Hanifi branch is less uniform in its character. An example of this pluralism within the system was the local development of an irrigation law in Khurasan.
In its early stages, the Hanafi orientation spread in the eastern regions of Islam, like Khurasan (modern Afghanistan) and Transoxania (modern Uzbekistan and southwest Kazakhstan). Hanafi spread even to Maghreb, where it coexisted with the Maliki system until the 11th century.
Hanafi Shari'a spread under the Ottoman Empire, and has survived in some regions until today. As in Tunisia, where it is defined as equal to Maliki, and in Egypt where it is the official school of law. In the east, Hanafi Shari'a dominates large areas, such as Afghanistan, Turkmenistan and parts of Uzbekistan.




By Tore Kjeilen