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Salah Jadid
Arabic: salāh 'al-jadīd


(1926- ) Syrian military and politician. Jadid was the most influential politician in Syria from early 1966 to late 1970, when allies of Hafez al-Assad had him arrested. Since then, he has been inactive in Syrian politics, spending time in prison and under civil surveillance.
The politics of Jadid were strong socialist attempts to reform the Syrian society. During his period of real political power, Syria removed itself from the countries in the West, and closer to the communist bloc.

Biography
1926: Born in Duwayr Ba'abda.
1958: Jadid is transferred to Egypt, following the establishment of the United Arab Republic.
1959: Together with Hafez al-Assad and two other officers from the Ba'th Party, he forms the secret Military Committee.
1961: Jadid is part of the actions where the Military Committee makes Syria leave the United Arab Republic.
1963 March: Jadid is central in the Ba'th takeover of Syrian politics.
October: Jadid is promoted to chief of staff in the Syrian military forces.
1964: Jadid loses his position due to power struggle in the Ba'th Party.
1966 February: Jadid uses his military allies to take back power, and becomes the most powerful person in Syrian politics. He has Nuriddin Attasi appointed prime minister.
1967 June: The defeat to Israel in the Six-Day War gives a heavy blow to the public opinion of Jadid's regime.
1969 February: Assad becomes the real ruler of Syria, but Jadid still holds a strong and central position in Syrian politics.
1970 September: With the start of fightings between the PLO and the Jordanian army, Jadid sends Palestinian troops, based in Syria, into Jordan in order to help PLO. This action was not supported by the Syrian air forces, which was under Assad's control, and results in failure.
November 12: Jadid is arrested by Assad's men, and removed from power. He ends up being thrown into prison.
1983: Jadid is released from prison, and put under civil surveillance.




By Tore Kjeilen