Bookmark and Share


Ancient Egypt /
Religion
1. Introduction
2. Gods
3. Concepts
4. Cult
5. Cult centres
6. Necropolises
7. Structures

Detailed articleAncient Egypt



























Open the online Arabic language course






Open map of Ancient EgyptAncient Egypt / Religion / Structures / Pyramids / Giza
Khufu, Pyramid of



Pyramid of Khufu, Giza, Egypt
ZOOM - Open a large version of this image

Pyramid of Khufu, Giza, Egypt
ZOOM - Open a large version of this image

The apex.

Pyramid of Khufu

Pyramid of Khufu, Giza, Egypt
ZOOM - Open a large version of this image

Pyramid of Khufu, Giza, Egypt
ZOOM - Open a large version of this image

One of the boat pits.

In Ancient Egypt, a pyramid at Giza, Egypt, built by the command of King Khufu as his tomb, finished around 2566 BCE. The Pyramid of Khufu is the largest pyramid in the world, at almost 2.6 million m³. It is also referred to as the Great Pyramid.
Its original measures are 146.5 metres height, and 230 metres along its base. Today it stands at 138.8 metres. The angle of its sides are 51º50'. It was built by 2,300,000 blocks, with an average weight of 2.5 tons, but the size of the stones diminished towards the top. The exact size and quality of the inner stones are unknown, and it has been suggested that these may have been of some form of concrete.
The exterior was covered by Turah limestone, but all of this has been stripped by house builders through thousands of years. The lower casing stones were here, as is the case with the two other king pyramids at Giza, built by granite. Some of these stones may have weighed up to 15 tons.
The construction period is estimated to have lasted about 20 years.
The interior of the pyramid is a downward shaft, originally beginning at an opening 15 metres up from the ground. 30 metres down, a new shaft climbs up to the centre in which the king's chamber is located. There are two more shafts allowing human entry, one continuing from the first shaft, ending in an empty chamber in the ground. The second shaft begins almost half way up the one leading to the king's chamber, leading to what is called the queen's chamber.
The largest stones of the king's chamber can have weighed up to 80 tons.
Air shafts were either constructed to allow air into the structure, or to fulfill astrological and religious purposes of the structure.
Khufu's pyramid is the oldest, and only surviving, of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.





Confused? Try to find a good place to start learning about Ancient Egypt in
Where to begin?Detailed article






By Tore Kjeilen