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Latin Empire of Constantinople
Latin: Romania



Tomb in the Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey, of the Doge of Venice, Enrico Dandolo, who was central in the establishment of the Latin Empire of Constantinople.
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Tomb in the Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey, of the Doge of Venice, Enrico Dandolo, who was central in the establishment of the Latin Empire of Constantinople.


Latin emperors
Last column, length of reign
Baldwin 1 1204-1205 2
Henry 1206-1216 10
Yolanda 1217-1219 2
Peter 1217 1
Robert 1 1219-1228 9
Baldwin 2 1228-1261 33
John of Brienne 1229-1237 8
In exile
Baldwin 2 1261-1273 12
Philip 1 1273-1283 10
Catherine 1 1283-1308 25
Charles of Valois 1301-1308 7
Catherine 2 1308-1346 38
Philip 2 1313-1332 19
Robert 2 1346-1364 18
Philip 3 1364-1373 9
James of Baux 1373-1383 10

Christian empire in a territory around much of the Aegean Sea, the Sea of Marmara and the Bosporus, 1204-1261, 57 years. The empire was centered to Constantinople, while having modern European Turkey and most of Greece as its main land territory.
The empire came by with the 4th Crusade. The goal of the establishment of this empire was to replace the Greek Orthodox rulers of the Byzantine Empire with Roman Catholic rulers.
The state appears to have been neither well nor poorly governed. Its short existence, indicates that that its rulers did not pay enough attention to its military.

History
1204: Constantinople is sacked by Christian Crusaders.
May 16: Baldwin, the count of Flanders, is crowned Emperor.
— Conquered Byzantine territory, consisting of the western parts, is divided. Much of the sea territory passes to Venice, the remainder stays with the new emperor.
— The Byzantine state structures survives, although no longer ruled from Constantinople, but there are deep conflicts between its regions. Three regions form new states; Despotate of Epirus (Greece), the Empire of Nicaea (Iznik, Turkey), and the Empire of Trebizond (Trabzon, Turkey).
1261 July 25: Michael 8 Palaiologos captures Constantinople, deposing the Latin Emperor, Baldwin 2, reestablishing the Byzantine Empire.
— The Latin Empire survives the loss of Constantinople, remaining in control of territory in the Aegean Sea, and its rulers still used the title "Latin emperor". As actual power diminished this would dwindle into a position only with a court and prestige, but no land nor power.
1333: The emperor comes in control over Achaea in Greece, adding the title "Prince of Achaea".
1383: James of Baux dies without heirs, becoming the last emperor.




By Tore Kjeilen