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Ancient Egypt /
Religion
1. Introduction
2. Gods
3. Concepts
4. Cult
5. Cult centres
6. Necropolises
7. Structures

Detailed articleAncient Egypt



























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Open map of Ancient EgyptAncient Egypt / Religion / Structures /
Naos


Naos of the Temple of Horus, Edfu.
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Naos of the Temple of Horus, Edfu, Egypt.

In Ancient Egyptian Religion, the innermost part of a shrine or temple.
The term is from Greek, and was a designation used for temples of Greek religion. The term has been implemented for Egyptian temples, too. In the preparation of Contents, no Egyptian term was found for 'naos'.
A naos could be either the inner chamber itself, or a rectangular chest or box made from a single block of wood or stone placed inside the inner chamber. It contained a cult-image or a sacred bark of a deity. Often, an offering table was erected in front of the naos.
Naos could also appear in representations, like a crown for a deity, or being held in the hands of statues of humans. Naos-bearing statues are called 'naophorous'.
The naos could also be used in connection with death, containing a funerary statue or a mummified animal.
Most known examples of Egyptian naos are from the Late Period.





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By Tore Kjeilen