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Christianity /
New Testament



Books
Gospels
Matthew
Mark
Luke
John
Historical
The Acts Text
Letters
Romans
1. Corinthians
2. Corinthians
Galatians
Ephesians
Philippians
Colossians
1. Thessalonians
2. Thessalonians
1. Timothy
2. Timothy
Titus
Philemon
Hebrews
James
1. Peter
2. Peter
1. John
2. John
3. John
Jude
Prophetic work
Revelation

Collection of religious texts, that are central to Christianity. There are 27 texts, or books as they are called.
The texts of the New Testament were written in Greek. Their content is loosely a narration of the first century of Christianity. It all start with Jesus, son of God, and continues into the period of transition from sectarianism inside Judaism, into the moulding of a new religion. In between the stories, there are many commandments and advices to the believers. Many of these differ strongly from what is told in the Old Testament. The histories end with the book Revelation, where the immediate end of the world is predicted.
The central themes of the New Testament is underlining Jesus as Messiah; that redemption from sin only could be obtained through the belief in Jesus; transmission of the message to all peoples, not only Jews as was the situation in the beginning with Jesus, who sought to renew Judaism; Christian conduct; and governing of the Church (understood as the union of the believers).
The process of collecting the books which were to make up the New Testament, started in the 2nd century BCE, when 10 letters of Saint Paul were held up as an authority for the young Church. Towards the end of 2nd century Saint Irenaeus argued for the authority of the gospels. The final decision on the canon (which books were to join the holy collection of books) cannot be dated exactly. But we know for the least that the 27 books of today's New Testament were put together by Saint Jerome, when he was appointed by Pope Damasus to render the Bible into Latin in the early 380s. There are good possibilities that the canon was established before him, though.




By Tore Kjeilen