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Ancient Egypt /
Religion
1. Introduction
2. Gods
3. Concepts
4. Cult
5. Cult centres
6. Necropolises
7. Structures

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Soleb



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Soleb

Temple of Amenophis 3. Soleb, Sudan.
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Temple of Amenophis 3. Soleb, Sudan.

Amenophis 3.
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Amenophis 3.

Lion of Amenhotep 3, reinscribed for Tutankhamon. Now in British Museum, London, UK.
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Lion of Amenhotep 3, reinscribed for Tutankhamon. Now in British Museum, London, UK.


Ancient Egyptian temple site in Cush, on the west bank of the Nile, right south of the 3rd cataract in modern Sudan.
The temple here was built in the 14th century BCE by the command of Amenophis 3 and dedicated to Amon-Re of Karnak and Nebmaatre, which was both a deified version of the king himself and a local variant of Khonsu. Nebmaatre was represented as a moon-god with the horns of Amon.
This temple is the best preserved Egyptian-built temple in Sudan.
The temple was located close to the river, allowing a processional way from a quay to the main halls.
It was built with two pylons, a hypostyle hall, a courtyard and of course a sanctuary, resembling much the Temple of Luxor. It was altogether 130 metre long, and had columns carved as papyrus.
The temple here at Soleb played a central role in some the Egyptian myths, like where the eye of Horus was lost in a battle with Seth in Nubia. After this, the eye was supposed to have taken on the appearence of a lioness. Two granite lions are among the most famous elements from the temple, but now in British Museum.
Within the temple complex there were was the arena to celebrate the Heb-Sed festival.





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By Tore Kjeilen