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Meknes



Meknes
Introduction

1. Imperial city

2. Bab el-Mansour

3. Koubba el-Khayatine

4. Mausoleum of Moulay Ismail

5. Dar el-Makhzen

6. Heri es-Souani

7. Details

8. Agdal basin

9. The medina

10. Suuqs

11. Dar Jama´

12. Medersa Bou Inania

13. Mausoleum of Sidi ben A´ssa

14. Flogging wool

Practicalities




















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MEKNES
Bab el-Mansour

Meknes, Morocco

Among the most impressive elements of the imperial city was the grand gate named after the architect, El-Mansour, a Christian renegade who converted to Islam. It was completed 5 years after Moulay Ismail's death, in 1732.
The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics of excellent quality. The marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis.
The story tells that when completed, Moulay Ismail inspected the gate, asking El-Mansur if he could do better. El-Mansur felt complied to answer yes, making the sultan so furious he had him executed. Still, according to historical records, the gate was finished after Moulay Ismail's death.
The gate itself is now used as an arts and crafts galleyr; entry is by a side gate.





By Tore Kjeilen